sluceNo.1163
Sébastien Luce 
(France)


No.1163.1 Sébastien Luce &
Alain Bienabe
(France)

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Original Problems, Julia’s Fairies – 2016 (II): July – December

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No.1163 Sébastien Luce
France

original – 07.12.2016

Solution: (click to show/hide)

White Kh6 Rg6 Pa7b7f6a5f5g5h5d4 Black Kf8 Pa6c5

ser-==22                                (10+3)
Alphabetic Chess


No.1163.1 Sébastien Luce &
Alain Bienabe

France

version of No.1163 – 18.12.2016

Solution: (click to show/hide)

White Kh6 Rg5 Pa7b7c7f6d5h5f4g4 Black Kf8

ser-==24                                (10+1)
Alphabetic Chess


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Geoff Foster
Geoff Foster
December 7, 2016 23:45

Is it worth extending the problem so that the pieces on the g- and h-files move into place at the end?

Erich Bartel
Erich Bartel
December 8, 2016 13:53
Luce Sebastien
Luce Sebastien
December 8, 2016 21:51

Dear Geoff,

I had also the idea to make a longer problem, for instance with white Pawn a5 in a2, white Pawn
f6/f5 in f2/f4, white Pawn g5 in g2 and maybe white Rook g6 in a3 (?!) to propose as the key move 1.Ra3-g3 but…
…as I tested my problem in 38 mn with Winchloe, I had not the patience to do it with a longer problem, and also there is the question “is it interesting ?”

But if you succeed to test a longer (interesting) version of this problem, I propose you to co-sign it ! 🙂

I hope you are fine Geoff, give me some news by mail, you are a friend !
Best

S N Ravi Shankar
S N Ravi Shankar
December 9, 2016 09:49

I found a setting which i tried testing with Popeye yesterday. It took hours and hours and finally, I had to come out.

5k2/P7/p4p2/8/8/8/PPP1PPPP/R3K3
Ser-==47 Alphabhetic Chess

1.a4 2.Ra3 3.Rg3 4.a5 5.a8=B 6.Bd5 7.b4 8.b5 9.b6 10.b7 11.b8=S 12.Sc6 13.c4 14.c5 15.Sd8 16.c6 17.c7 18.c8=Q 19.Qxa6 20.Qa7 21.a6 22.Qh7 23.a7 24.a8=R 25.Ra7 26.Rg7 27.Bg8 28.Sf7 29. Kd2 30.Ke3 31.Kf3! 32.e4 33.e5 34.exf6 35.Kg4 36.f4 37.f5 38.Sh8 39.f7 40.f6 41.Kh5 42.Rg6 43.g4 44.g5 45.h4 46.Kh6 47.h5==

If sound, it should be interesting because the final position is well covered.

Joost
Joost
December 9, 2016 21:29

Doesn’t work, after 44. g5 white must play Rh6.

Joost
Joost
December 9, 2016 21:30
Reply to  Joost

Furthermore, after 40. f6, white must play with Rg3.

S N Ravi Shankar
S N Ravi Shankar
December 13, 2016 20:43
Reply to  Joost

Quite right. Further, 9.b5xa6 is also possible. Another version has been sent to Julia for publishing afresh.

S N Ravi Shankar
S N Ravi Shankar
December 9, 2016 10:25

I just noticed that wR can move along the rank! Perhaps wK can be shifted to b1 or wR can start from a3 – as the author points out –
with change in stipulation.

Luce Sebastien
Luce Sebastien
December 9, 2016 15:57

Dear M. Ravi Shankar,
your setting is very interesting !
If you have more patience than me to test it, I encourage you to do it (with co signature at the end of course !).
M. Pierre Tritten told me that it is not necessary to have the famous C+ to present a new longer version. I don’t know your opinion about that ? Please inform me if you find new versions :
luceechecs@gmail.com

Luce Sebastien
Luce Sebastien
December 9, 2016 16:30

by the way, I notice that in my original version,
black c5 is probably not necessary: with white Pawn c4 instead of d4 it seems ok ! I have to test it…

Joost
Joost
December 12, 2016 12:11
Reply to  Luce Sebastien

C+ in 5 minutes (popeye 4.76 SVN version) with d4 to c5 and ser-==21

S N Ravi Shankar
S N Ravi Shankar
December 19, 2016 15:43

In my version (See solution to 1163.1), the play up to move No.23 is similar to 1163 which is C+. The position reached after blacks 23rd move is also C+ (Popeye -v4.63)

S N Ravi Shankar
S N Ravi Shankar
January 2, 2017 11:52

Here is a version of 1163.1.

Remove the rook, add a wP on b5 and shift d-pawn to d4. -Ser-==31

Popeye Windows-32Bit v4.63 (512 MB)

1.a7-a8=S 2.Sa8-b6 3.Sb6-c8 4.b5-b6 5.b7-b8=R 6.b6-b7 7.Rb8-a8 8.Ra8-a5 9.Ra5-g5 10.b7-b8=Q 11.Qb8-b1 12.Qb1-h7 13.Sc8-d6 14.c7-c8=B 15.Bc8-e6 16.d4-d5 17.Sd6-e8 18.d5-d6 19.d6-d7 20.d7-d8=R 21.Rd8-d7 22.Rd7-g7 23.Be6-g8 24.Se8-d6 25.Sd6-f7 26.f4-f5 27.Sf7-h8 28.f6-f7 29.f5-f6 30.Rg5-g6 31.g4-g5 a=>b

solution finished. Time = 1.510 s

My thanks to Geoff Foster for his response to 1174.

Joost
Joost
January 2, 2017 15:00

9 white pawns?

S N Ravi Shankar
S N Ravi Shankar
January 2, 2017 19:19

oops!I did not notice it. I should have used a chess set!

seetharaman
seetharaman
January 2, 2017 21:26

🙂

Luce Sebastien
Luce Sebastien
January 3, 2017 14:54

Dear Ravi
your version with 9 Pawns interest me !!
I have an idea (for the future) to write an article with the title “OUTLAW!” with interesting but illegal positions !
Could you send me by mail the pos. ?
I invite all composers to send me also their positions in the same style !
Here is my mail :
luceechecs@gmail.com